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Preliminary results of the 2014 Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on STCW Hours of Work and Rest

The purpose of the CIC was to gain an overall impression of compliance with STCW Hours of Rest following concern over several incidents where fatigue was considered to be a factor. Also of concern was that a bridge lookout was being maintained.
A CIC Questionnaire and guidance was developed by the Paris MoU in conjunction with the Tokyo MoU. The Questionnaire comprised 14 questions to be answered by the Port State Control Officer (PSCO) during every Port State Control (PSC) inspection during the period of the CIC. Out of the 14 questions, 9 were directly related to the CIC and 4 were for information gathering purposes.
The CIC was carried out on all ships targeted for inspection from 1st September 2014 until 30th November 2014.

It is well recognised that fatigue is a major risk and frequently features as a contributory cause of casualties, particularly groundings. Thereby, despite the announcement of the CIC Questionnaire to the industry, observation of lack of correctly records related to the hours of rest raise great concern. Non-compliance or inadequate record keeping is a significant potential danger to the vessel itself and all on board and high rate of non-compliances observed on board ships 25 years and older indicates a potential risk.

The requirements that raised the most concern in the CIC over all the MOUs were:
• lack of correctly records related to hours of rest ;
• non-compliance with the STCW requirements in lack of records of daily hours of rest for each watch keeper
• Bridge look out not being maintained

The Secretary General for Paris MoU, Richard Schiferli, says: “Insufficient rest of watchkeeping personnel has already caused several incidents over the past years. It may be the cause of fatigue, which can have major consequences for safety and the environment. Two-watch systems are particularly vulnerable in this respect.”

The results from Paris MoU showed that a total of 1,268 ships were operating with a two-watch system for the navigational watch, and that 13 of these ships were detained

Download the preliminary reports from the Paris MOU and Black Sea MOU